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Army National Guard

CST helps prepare for nuclear incidents

Defense Threat Reduction Agency Public Affairs

Published: 02:23PM March 9th, 2017
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Homeland Response Force Academy

Maj. Harry Stockton, left, a Defense Nuclear Weapons School instructor, demonstrates the use of radiation detection equipment at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., Feb. 23.

The threat of a radiological or nuclear attack exists everywhere.

That’s why the Defense Threat Reduction Agency’s Defense Nuclear Weapons School-Reserve Component at Kirtland Air Force Base, N.M., emphasizes the Introduction to Radiological and Nuclear Incident Response course and teaches it to audiences worldwide.

“Responders need to know how to deal with it,” said Maj. Michael G. Schlueter, Defense Nuclear Weapons School instructor. “To have this awareness course means you are that much more prepared. Any accident or incident can pose a potential radiological threat.”

The free, two-day courses are sponsored by the Army National Guard’s 10th Civil Support Team located at Camp Murray and are offered three times this month — March 18 to 19, March 20 to 21 and March 22 to 23.

Seats are open to all military, government civilians, area responders and emergency managers.

“The (Introduction to Radiological and Nuclear Incident Response course) is a two-day awareness level course developed to increase confidence and skill in responding to and mitigating the consequences of radiological events, as well as weapons of mass destruction,” Schlueter said. “It is primarily for all U.S. military, federal, tribal, state and local emergency planners, managers and responders.

“Joint Base Lewis-McChord and Camp Murray (are) great venues because of the various organizations in the area that would likely be involved should a radiological or nuclear incident take place.”

The 10th CST also brings the Introduction to Radiological and Nuclear Incident Response course to Washington to provide a networking opportunity, and for other agencies to benefit, to help better prepare themselves and the community.

“These types of training opportunities are essential for our continuing efforts to nurture the dynamic working relationships we have cultivated within our local communities,” said Maj. Ty Clark of the 10th CST. “We utilize these types of events to broaden our outreach program, since the last thing we want is to arrive on scene at an incident and find ourselves working with strangers. The more time we can spend training with our response partners, the better prepared we will be during a real world event, and this will position us to potentially save more lives.”

The Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency, and the National Training Education Division approved the course for inclusion in their state and federal sponsored course catalog. It is also accredited by the American Council on Education as a continuing education course.

The Defense Threat Reduction Agency’s Defense Nuclear Weapons School-Reserve Component is the Department of Defense’s go-to organization for this type of awareness training.

“Our Reserve mobile training teams are already slated this year to teach more than 1,200 first responders, military and executives,” Schlueter said.

Mobile training teams are available upon request. The course and materials are free to registered participants.

For more information, call the Introduction to Radiological and Nuclear Incident Response course manager at 505-846-0663 or 505-846-0664.