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Ready and Resilient for today, the future

I Corps Ready and Resilient Director

Published: 03:35PM March 9th, 2017
161128-A-OF914-007

5th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment

Lt. Gen. Stephen R. Lanza, middle left, I Corps commanding general, speaks to Gen. Daniel B. Allyn, middle, vice chief of staff of the Army, about the programs within the Ready and Resiliency Campaign Joint Base Lewis-McChord last November.

Ready and Resilient is a term that is used heavily in our current military, but R2 is not just a fad word. Ready and Resilient is way of life that will benefit us not only in our military decisions and actions, but also one that will benefit us into the future.

Ready and Resilient directly links to increased Soldier readiness to train and deploy.

Whether you know it or not, you are likely already implementing R2 practices in your daily life. If you’re a service member at a physical training formation or on the range, your ability to mentally push through a formation run or focus your breathing to get the shot — that’s part of R2.

If you are a family member that is managing your household in addition to your children, personal ventures, work, or school — that’s R2.

Ready and Resilient focuses on the strength of our military — the people. The military and its units are only as strong as the service members, civilians and family members across its formations.

Our people must be physically, psychologically, socially and spiritually ready and resilient to thrive in military life’s uncertainties, or at least be prepared to thrive. Leaders must understand the importance of this softer science of readiness.

Ready and Resilient encompasses the entire service member and his or her well-being. Our service members are highly trained in their specialty skills — often the element that leads to nondeployability lies with one of the R2 dimensions that are harder to codify and guard against.

That is where R2 programs can help. Ready and Resilient can mitigate factors that affect a service member’s well-being. Getting after these elements will ensure a more ready service member.

Military professionals at all levels are responsible for cultivating positive climates where respect and mutual trust are demonstrated. Ready and Resilient practices are designed for everyone, and everyone no matter where you are in life can benefit from using them.

Leaders should strive to create a healthy environment that promotes well-being behavior. Through cohesive teams and responsible leaders, trust is created which reduces adverse outcomes and increases positive behaviors.

Ready and Resilient reinforces the need to achieve and sustain personal readiness and resilience. Everyone’s R2 practices will be unique to the person.

As leaders, it’s important to recognize the different approaches and tactics that individuals require to achieve readiness. There are many resources available at Joint Base Lewis-McChord for improving individual and unit readiness.

I encourage all service members to educate themselves on the various programs available to be more aware of ways to help not only yourself but also your family and friends. Look for the monthly R2 Courage Cable for topics and resources.

So … #RUR2?